English Literature: A-Level

Course Description
English Literature Advanced Level provides students with a natural progression from their GCSE study of English Literature. It encourages students to develop their interest in, and appreciation of, a range of literary texts, through learning about their structures, context and language choices. This course allows students to develop their ability to express themselves, in speech and writing, during close textual analysis of a range of novels, plays and poetry. It encourages students to take responsibility for their own learning and gives them a strong grounding in the academic principles relating to the exploration of a writer’s choices. This course is particularly suitable for those students who wish to study English Literature, English Studies or Journalism in Higher Education. It is a facilitating subject for Russell Group Universities and extremely well regarded at all higher education establishments.
 
Course Outline
 
The A2 course consists of four core units, which are assessed through written exam (open book – students will have the texts with them) and a coursework module in year 13. Guided learning hours will be a combination of timetabled class time and independent study. Completing the two units in the first year will lead to 1 x AS Level pass. Completing the additional two units in a second year will lead to achieving 1 x A2 Level pass.
 
Year 1 (AS Level)
 
Unit 1 – Poetry and Drama
60% (of total AS marks)
 
Students study:
A selection of specified poetry from a post-2000 anthology
One chosen play from a prescribed list (either tragedy or comedy)
 
Examination:
2-hour open book exam – one essay about the play and a comparative poetry essay
 
Unit 2 – Prose
40% (of total AS marks)
 
Students study:
Two prose texts from a chosen theme
At least one of the texts must be pre-1900
 
Examination:
1-hour open book exam to write a comparative essay
 
 
 
 
 
Year 2 (A2 Level)
 
Unit 1 – Drama
30% (of total A level marks)
 
Students study:
A Shakespeare play
Revision of the play studied in year 12
 
Examination:
2hr15 open book exam to write one essay on each play
 
Unit 2 – Prose
20% (of total A level marks)
 
Students revise:
Two prose texts from a chosen theme
At least one of the texts must be pre-1900
 
Examination:
1-hour open book exam to write a comparative essay
 
Unit 3 – Poetry
30% (of total A level marks)
 
Students study:
A selection of post-2000 poetry (as studied in year 12)
A selection of poetry that is either by a named poet or from a literary period
 
Examination:
2hr15 open book exam to write one comparative essay (Post-2000) and one essay
 
Unit 4 – Coursework
20% (of total A level marks)
 
Students have a free choice of two texts to study. Chosen texts must be:
Different from those already studied on the course
Linked by theme, movement, author or period
 
Examination:
One extended comparative essay (2500-3000 words)
 
Career Opportunities
Studying English Literature develops your written and verbal communications skills, your ability to use words to your advantage and to think and respond analytically. Whilst this obviously does transfer from A-Level to degree level, these skills would be of benefit to students who wish to study law, forensic science, psychology, business - the list goes on. In the work place, communication skills developed through English study would benefit anyone who wishes to move up to management level; while a number of employers in the finance and computing sectors look to employ students with an English background to tailor their existing skills into the industry. 
Progression to University
The ability to read, write, analyse, explore, compare, contrast and interpret, are skills that provide the foundation of the English Literature course and are transferable to a wide variety of university courses, including the top Universities in the country.