Music

Music

Music is fundamental to human life; it is unusual to go more than a few minutes in a day without hearing some form of music whether it is in the background to a T.V programme or a song on the radio.
 
It also has the power to change your mood and is present in every culture around the world. By studying music students are exposed to a wealth of different musical styles and instruments, working in musical ensembles builds teamwork and listening skills and deepens their understanding of history and cultures.
 
At Magna, we focus on the three main areas of Music; Composing, Performing and Listening.
 
Students get the opportunity to play a wide variety of instruments, including the Keyboard, Ukulele, Samba instruments and the African Drums. They are encouraged to use music technology to compose their own music and perform on their own and with others.
 

What will I learn?

In Years 7 and 8, students complete a course designed to give them the Performing, Composing and Listening skills to complete their Key Stage 4 course. They will be taught to play a number of different instruments, including the Keyboard, Ukulele, African Drums, and using Music Technology. They will also complete units of work on different genres of music, including Jazz and Blues, Pop Music and Reggae Music.
 
In Years 9-11, students who opt to study Music further study the RSL Level 2 Certificate for Music Practitioners in Performance. The course is focussed on the progress you make as a performer, allowing students who haven’t learnt an instrument formally before the start of the course to achieve the highest grades as well as those who have.
 
During the course, we complete 3 units – Instrumental Study, Music Rehearsal Skills and the core exam unit, Music Performance. Instrumental Study focuses on developing solo performance skills with students evaluating their current skills as a performer, setting targets and then evaluating their progress at the end of the unit. Music Rehearsal Skills follows a similar pattern but students can work in ensemble groups.
 
The Core exam unit – Music Performance is worth 40% of the qualification and has a brief given to students by RSL. They then have 20 hours to plan, rehearse, perform and evaluate a performance that answers the brief, past briefs have included a School Charity event and a Showcase for a Record label. Students work is then sent to RSL for marking.
 

What will I do?

In lessons students will complete a range of different tasks, rehearsing takes up the vast majority of our lesson time. However, other tasks we undertake also include research, watching performances and evaluating them. Setting targets to work towards and learning about other areas of the music profession such as Health and Safety and the importance of concepts such as punctuality, working with others and selecting performance repertoire.
 

What is the expectation of homework?

In Years 7 and 8 we do not set formal homework tasks. However, students are welcome to come into the Music department outside of lesson time to practice their work from their lessons or to try something new on the instruments.
 
In Years 9-11, we set an hour of homework a week. The homework task set depends on the part of the course we are completing but can involve writing evaluations, completing research/notes on a certain subject or rehearsing for a performance.
 

What support and guidance will I be given?

There are many different types of support on offer to students from the Music department; students are offered a lot of personalised support during lessons and also outside of lesson time when they come and practice for assessments. Other support is offered to students through enrichment opportunities, which allow students to develop their instrumental and ensemble skills further.
 
Outside of lessons, we also offer instrumental lessons taken during the Academy day given students’ further support in developing their instrumental skills further. We also take part in projects offered by other local organisations such as Aim Community, the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra and Soundstorm, our local music hub.
 

How will I be assessed?

In Years 7-11, students are assessed every 6 weeks, usually during PPE week. The focus of the assessments is always practical, with students having been preparing for their performance in the previous lessons. In Years 9-11, your written coursework will also form part of your 6-weekly assessment. All students receive a grade following their assessment and they evaluate their work, setting targets for future progress.
 
The vast majority of our assessments are videoed so work can be watched back and evaluated for setting targets. In Years 9-11 these videos also form part of your video evidence, which will be sent off to the exam board to form part of your qualification.
 

What equipment do I need to be successful?

We do not expect students to provide their own instruments; all instruments needed in lessons and for students qualifications are in school and can be used by students, both during lessons and outside of lesson time.
 
In Years 9-11, it is recommended that students have access to an instrument at home so they can practice their performance work outside of lesson time. If this is not possible, students need to arrange a regular time, before or after school to practice their instrument to ensure they achieve the highest grades.

 

What other opportunities exist outside of class?

The Music department offers a wide variety of enrichment opportunities to students, these include Keyboard Club, Ukulele Club, Musical Theatre club and our popular ‘School of Rock’. We also work with other departments such as Drama and Dance to put on larger scale performances and give our students opportunities to perform in front of an audience. We are also hoping to put on a Musical in the not so distant future as well.
 
Away from the stage, we also take part in a number of different projects which give our students an insight into different areas of the Music industry. These in the last few years have included Musical Podcasting, working with Ivor Award nominated Music producer Nathan Thomas, and a Music and Dance project based on Stravinsky’s ‘A Soldier’s tale’ in conjunction with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra.
 
Level 3 Music at Magna:
RSL Subsidiary Diploma for Music Practitioners in Performance
 

What will I learn?

The Level 3 RSL Subsidiary Diploma for Music Practitioners provides music industry qualifications that will equip learners with the skills, knowledge and understanding for entry to employment in the music industry or progression to further study at a higher level. The qualifications aim to offer practical structured learning with the flexibility to specialise in different disciplines directly relevant to employment within the music industry, including Composition, Performance, Business and Technology.
 
There 2 core units, one of which is externally assessed and one is internally assessed. This makes up 45 credits of the 90 needed for the whole qualification. The rest of the course is made up of optional units, an example course outline is below.
 
Externally Assessed Unit: Unit 387 “Rehearsal Skills and Live Music Performance” (Value: 30 credits)
Working to an Assignment brief given to you by RSL, this unit is completed over a 40 hour Controlled Assessment. During which you will complete 3 tasks which revolve around Planning, Rehearsing and Performing a musical performance to fit the brief given to you. You will be assessed on the depth and appropriateness of your response to the brief/task provided to you.
 
Internally Assessed Unit: Unit 349 – “Planning for a Career in the Music industry” (Value: 15 credits)
Looking at the different careers available to you in the Music industry, this unit is compulsory and looks at the production of a Career plan to allow you to achieve your entry into the Music industry. We will also make contact with people in the Music industry to allow you to gain interview experience and also an insight into different roles within the Music industry.
 
Optional Units (could change, depending on students instruments and interests)
 
Unit 355: “Leading a Music Making Activity” (10 credits)
 
Unit 365“Auditioning for Music” (15 credits)
 
Unit 308: “Contextualising Music” (5 credits)
 
Unit 385: “Improving Instrumental Performance" (15 credits)
 
 

What is the expectation of homework?

Homework is set every week, and takes on various forms depending on the work and unit being completed at the time. Different types of tasks can include – rehearsal for practical work, research and the production of associated written work, evaluation of performance and writing up of notes into a final piece of work.
 

How will I be assessed?

All units are assessed through a combination of Written work, Rehearsal logs, evaluations, rehearsals and final performance.
 

Where will it take me?

The Music/Performing Arts industry is huge in Great Britain, and it provides many potential career paths for students wishing to study it further. University to study Music or other associated subjects such as Journalism, Law, Performing Arts or Education is common, whilst there are a number of more specialised colleges offering professional training for Music performance.
 
Potential careers can be very varied, from a Teacher, to a Lawyer, the Radio industry and Arts Administration. It all depends on the career path students wish to follow. It is worth remembering that employers look for subjects such as Music in potential employees as it implies a team player who has the dedication to practice an instrument over a period of time.

 

What other opportunities exist outside of class?

Level 3 students are expected to take part in all performances, performing and supporting in roles such as backstage and stage management. They are also offered the opportunities to experience various ‘real life’ work situations to show them different potential career paths. They are also expected to play a leading role in the Music department, setting a good example for younger students in terms of performance and preparation.
 

What equipment do I need to be successful?

At Level 3, it is vital that Students have access to an instrument at home so they can complete the amount of practice required to achieve the high standards and progress this course requires for the top grade. If students do not have an instrument at the start of the course, the Music department can support them in hiring an instrument at low cost from the local Music hub, Soundstorm. Please contact Mrs Giles, via the Academy for further details.