History

History

Through the study of History and learning about the past, people are better able to understand how the present came to be. The study of history also enables people to learn from past mistakes. However, history is also entertaining, fascinating and inspiring. Pupils will learn how to analyse information, interpret it and evaluate its value in learning about past events. They will gain knowledge and understanding about the past and will therefore be better placed to make sense of the world around them.
 

What will I learn?

From Year 7 to Year 11 learners will follow the AQA History specifications, both with the new GCSE course and the AS/A2 course in Year 12 and 13. These qualifications will be practised regularly with internal assessment. They will culminate in terminal exams, externally assessed, in Year 11 and Year 13.
 
Learners will become familiar with the full range of historical skills.  They will develop their skills of evaluation by considering the usefulness of a source through the analysis of its content. They will also compare interpretations of history from different viewpoints and have an opportunity to explain the significance of an historical event or person.
 

What will I do?

Learners will cover a broad curriculum beginning with the Norman invasion in 1066, through the key developments of the middle ages and the struggle for power which led to the establishment of the Tudor dynasty. Students will also learn about the key events of the Civil War and the growth of empire running alongside the economic and social changes brought about by the industrial revolution in England. The World Wars of the twentieth century are covered in depth and serve as a basis for the understanding of the emergence of the Superpowers and the challenges presented by the Cold War.
 
From Year 9 onwards, the students will study the development of health and medicine in Britain, the emergence of Nazi Germany and the conflicts in Asia after World War Two as well as returning to complete a study set in the Norman period which considers the place of a significant building in the society.
 

What is the expectation of homework?

All homework will be set during the first lesson of the week and is due in the last lesson of the week. This will give ample opportunity for learners to complete their homework and seek support if they are struggling with it. The homework will involve reading and notetaking in order to prepare the learners for the topic they are studying. The content will extend their contextual knowledge and lay the foundations for solid mastery of the basic knowledge needed in order to explain ideas and concepts covered in the unit.
 

What support and guidance will I be given?

The History team will teach the skills needed to be successful and will provide ample opportunity for the students to practice and hone their exam skills. In addition, there are regular drop-in sessions to provide support with key ideas and concepts and an intervention programme for year 11 and 13 to give additional guidance prior to the examinations.
 

How will I be assessed?

Throughout Year 7 to 11 learners will be assessed each half term using previous AQA papers, to help them understand the standard required and to give them practice sitting exam-style questions. Each Year 7 and Year 8 learner will be given writing frames to help them construct their answers in a format that the exam boards require. The regular testing and assessment will enable us to set effectively and to ensure that students are building upon what they have previously learnt. 
 

What equipment do I need to be successful?

We expect all of the learners at Magna to attend their lessons with the correct equipment so that their learning is not affected. All learners should have pens, pencils, a ruler, a rubber, a protractor, a pair of compasses and a scientific calculator (preferably Casio fx-85GT Plus). In addition to this, a small pocket dictionary would be very useful as would access to a quality daily newspaper.
 

What other opportunities exist outside of class?

At Magna Academy we provide an environment for learners to develop their skills outside their history lessons. There will be opportunities during tutor time to reflect upon issues covered in assemblies which have a historical bias and a debating society as part of the enrichment programme. Cross curricular links within the departments and trips and visits also complement the learning in the classroom.
 
 
 
 

A Level History at Magna

What will I learn?

The course is intended to build on knowledge, understanding and skills established at GCSE. You are expected to be able to use the material covered at GCSE which provides the basic understanding and context for the three studies at A Level. These are designed to help students understand the significance of historical events, the role of individuals in history and the nature of change over time. The qualifications will help them to gain a deeper understanding of the past through political, social, economic and cultural perspectives. The engaging topics available to them throughout the course will provide them with the knowledge and skills they require to succeed as AS and A-level historians.
 
In Year 12 and 13 they will study:
 
The Tudors: England, 1485–1603
This option allows students to study in breadth issues of change, continuity, cause and consequence in this period through the following key questions:
 
  • How effectively did the Tudors restore and develop the powers of the monarchy?
  • In what ways and how effectively was England governed during this period?
  • How did relations with foreign powers change and how was the succession secured?
  • How did English society and economy change and with what effects?
  • How far did intellectual and religious ideas change and develop and with what effects?
  • How important was the role of key individuals and groups and how were they affected by developments?
 
In addition, their breadth study will be:
 
Democracy and Nazism: Germany, 1918–1945.
This option provides for the study in depth of a period of German history during which a newly developed democratic form of government gave way to a dictatorial Nazi regime. It explores political concepts such as 'right' and 'left', nationalism and liberalism as well as ideological concepts such as racialism, anti-Semitism and Social Darwinism. It also encourages reflection on how governments work and the problems of democratic states as well as consideration of what creates and sustains a dictatorship.
 
The third component is Historical Investigation. This will be independently researched and written by the student and based around a study of their choice involving a question spanning 100 years.
 

What is the expectation of homework?

All homework will be set during the first lesson of the week and is due in the first lesson of the following week. This will give ample opportunity for learners to complete their homework and seek support if they are struggling with it. The homework will involve reading and notetaking in order to prepare the learners for the topic they are studying. The content will extend their contextual knowledge and lay the foundations for solid mastery of the basic knowledge needed in order to explain ideas and concepts covered in the unit.
 
Learners will also be expected to read around the subject to improve their overall general knowledge of the periods under study.
 

How will I be assessed?

Learners will be assessed each half term using previous AQA past papers, to help them understand the standard required and to give them practice sitting exam-style questions. There is no better way to assess learners to see how they are progressing and to see what support they require to be successful. These will take the form of source based investigations of 25 marks and mini-essay questions also worth 25 marks.
 

Where will it take me?

Learners who successfully complete A-level History will have gained skills highly valued by employers, such as analytical and critical reasoning, oral and written communication and research skills  - a history qualification is a good launch pad for a wide range of careers, including law, the public sector, business management and finance. However, if you are passionate about history you may wish to use your degree in an area more directly related to your studies. In most cases, you will need further graduate and post-graduate qualifications, either a history specialism, research-based study or a specific vocational course.
 

What other opportunities exist outside of class?

All AS and A2 Level historians will have an opportunity to visit a university library to complete research for their Historical Investigation. In addition, there will be various trips and visits organised to complement the learning in lessons. For example, a recent visit to the Houses of Parliament gave students an insight into electoral processes and systems. 
 

What equipment do I need to be successful?

We expect all of the learners at Magna to attend their lessons with the correct equipment so that their learning is not affected. All learners should have pens, pencils, a ruler, a rubber, a protractor, a pair of compasses and a scientific calculator. However, by far the most important piece of equipment is an enquiring mind! There will be a requirement to purchase course textbooks.